Thousands of people sue the federal government over requirement to get school-based immunizations

More than 10 states on Monday joined a California lawsuit against the Obama administration over a federal requirement that school districts use a federal vaccine for children. Some of the lawsuits, filed in federal…

Thousands of people sue the federal government over requirement to get school-based immunizations

More than 10 states on Monday joined a California lawsuit against the Obama administration over a federal requirement that school districts use a federal vaccine for children.

Some of the lawsuits, filed in federal and state courts, are against the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and state governments, but some of the plaintiffs are groups within the states that want federal oversight of school districts, so their students could get the federal shots against diseases such as measles, rabies and hepatitis B.

The lawsuit, filed in 2009 and 2014, sought an injunction to stop the government from continuing the requirement. California is the leading plaintiff in Monday’s case, joined by the states of New York, Michigan, Connecticut, Indiana, Michigan, Oregon, Connecticut, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Florida, Wisconsin and Kentucky. In California, the lawsuit was filed by conservative member of the state Assembly, and aimed at immunizing school children against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio, measles, mumps, rubella, hepatitis B and chickenpox.

“We are going to protect the small children in our communities and keep them safe,” said Brian Dahle, the Republican who represents the district.

The federal government does not have control over the process of hiring school contractors. However, the CDC recommended in 2009 that school districts use a vaccine meant to prevent chickenpox called DTaP, for the shot to immunize children at 12 months, and again at 18 months. In California, most school districts use the vaccine.

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