Pranita Sundaram, CEO of the England Football Association, takes us to interview Emma Hayes of the Lionesses, about gender equality in football

With 12 months of her tenure as England’s head coach already under her belt, Emma Hayes is taking a seat in the extraordinary company of Johan Cruyff, Pep Guardiola and Diego Maradona, as an…

Pranita Sundaram, CEO of the England Football Association, takes us to interview Emma Hayes of the Lionesses, about gender equality in football

With 12 months of her tenure as England’s head coach already under her belt, Emma Hayes is taking a seat in the extraordinary company of Johan Cruyff, Pep Guardiola and Diego Maradona, as an international women’s football coach, to talk about inequality in the game.

Her achievements do not come without pressure. She is only the second woman to manage England, only the second to oversee a European Championship, and that just underlines the wider challenges that face women’s football. Since her appointment, the Lionesses’ results have been only ever-so-slightly more impressive than the dismal performances of their male counterparts. (Women won nine of 10 matches at Euro 2017, while men took home just two.)

Hayes founded and coaches alongside Unax Vida; the trio has been working together for over 25 years and has created the Women’s Soccer Project, a development and coaching program targeting boys and girls.

The pair — the great, the good and the any-other-woman-fun-you-want — were gathered to discuss equality in the game by Pranita Sundaram, CEO of the England Football Association.

Would the FA be good at establishing its own set of paid coaches for women? What sort of salary structure should govern them? Would it be possible to keep the eye on the ball and push for equal treatment while under pressure of hosting the 2022 World Cup? And what about quotas? Where do you stand on the subject?

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