Huxian Holiday opens in Shanghai

Written by by Katharine Gammon, CNN Downtown Shanghai’s rising skyline lit up in vibrant colors for Halloween. Home to many of China’s biggest companies, including Bank of China and ZTE, the city has struggled…

Huxian Holiday opens in Shanghai

Written by by Katharine Gammon, CNN

Downtown Shanghai’s rising skyline lit up in vibrant colors for Halloween.

Home to many of China’s biggest companies, including Bank of China and ZTE, the city has struggled with rampant pollution in recent years and a growing wealth gap. The country’s government has launched several new campaigns to improve air quality.

Every year, as part of the month-long Huxian festival, the city’s citizens deck out their homes and offices to celebrate the holiday. Huxian translates to “dream” in Chinese, and refers to a historical Chinese legend, in which kids dream of flying to Heaven to find hidden treasure.

Visitors can catch a glimpse of the decorations each year, just down the road from one of the city’s most iconic landmarks, the World Trade Center

This year, the decorations — recreated from the earliest days of the pandemic — were large-scale this year.

As you drive towards the Three Gorges Tower on Tower Road, start to notice the haunted location.

A surprising number of kids dance, scream and wail in the dark, as over 5,000 elaborate decorations cover both floors of a 10-floor building.

As the night continues, a spooky chimney takes center stage, indicating the tallest building on the city’s skyline.

The building in Huxian celebrates the annual Huxian festival every November 1-8.

Cylindrical pumpkins lit up in different colors from the chest of children inside the Halloween-themed building.

The Chinese characters for Happy, Fearless, Strong and Happy inside the haunted structure.

Ghost and goblins, as well as cornstalks to represent the spirit of the phobias, ring in the holiday. (While most US states celebrate Halloween, China celebrates Lantern Festival instead, with costumes and festivity in the Western Chinese community.)

The team at the building decorated all of the 80 rooms with lights, flowers and a facelift that was unveiled three years ago.

Pavilions were built, with names like Spiderweb and “Truth and Evil.” (In an ironic twist, the team also won Best Wedding in Chinese at the Golden Domestic Cup last year.)

The grand ballroom covered all 40-feet of the floor with a bright orange, metallic display, complete with horses and dragons. Other rooms (like the ones with the fake hand, wishing well and crystal floors) have paved the way for other haunted creations.

Across the street from the building, the People’s Garden is where thousands of onlookers gather to take a photo of the lanterns. The cars in front of the government buildings would not have been reflective enough for the color of the display in the window to give off an effect of ghostly lights.

Many of the decorations and decorations are replicas of the ones used in the original pumpkin festival, made up of numbers and coded parts.

A hall filled with lights, that resembles a pumpkin.

Super-sized spirit takes over this massive building.

Home to China’s richest man, Alibaba founder Jack Ma, The World Trade Center made an elaborate show of their creations as well.

Walking through the halls to see the colorful decorations, the smell of cotton candy fills the room, juxtaposed with the shiny silver dioramas, and the images of the lost of desire.

The Chinese cephalopod made a limited appearance in the basement area, as a sea creature with “bears” on its side.

The real bats were displayed above ground.

Floating with the tide in the world trade tower.

Street performers give their voices to the sounds of the song by wailing in the dark.

The lack of genuine Christmas spirit (read: sweets, decorations, friends, carolers) meant that most people were far less interested in the lights and decorations this year.

Despite this, the noise still reached outside the space.

Leave a Comment