From groping to street checks: 5 ways men can lose out from women’s gender equality campaign

Getty Images Street checks by officers in Britain are becoming so common that last summer, Ukip leader Nigel Farage complained about them. The number of stop-and-searches has more than doubled in a decade, to…

From groping to street checks: 5 ways men can lose out from women's gender equality campaign

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Street checks by officers in Britain are becoming so common that last summer, Ukip leader Nigel Farage complained about them. The number of stop-and-searches has more than doubled in a decade, to more than one million last year. Yet the percentage of people with no criminal record arrested or convicted after being stopped by the police, known as the police “stop figure”, has fallen. That suggests we’ve increasingly become a “voluntary or administrative stop-and-search regime”, says Paul Green, president of the Police Federation of England and Wales. “There are no statistics on the identity of those who are involved in this petty harassment.”

Officers have been instructed to take down the driver’s details when stopped, but the police often say they have “no comment.”

Reliable figures are not available but the British Crime Survey estimates that more than nine out of 10 were victims of some form of street harassment or sexual assault.

The government’s Safer Roads Review, which urges the police to focus on tackling crime rather than controlling people’s movements, rejected “stop and search.” Instead, it recommended extending public transport checks and arming all traffic officers with non-lethal weapons to allow them to break up fights more effectively.

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