Canada vitals: New travel policy will verify vaccinations of international travelers

Canada has changed its travel standards to automatically verify the vaccinations of international travelers. The new policy is intended to prevent travelers with low vaccination records from acquiring and bringing diseases like measles and…

Canada vitals: New travel policy will verify vaccinations of international travelers

Canada has changed its travel standards to automatically verify the vaccinations of international travelers. The new policy is intended to prevent travelers with low vaccination records from acquiring and bringing diseases like measles and mumps to Canada. The fact that this common-sense rule already exists in the United States is a testament to how much concern the new policy draws in the U.S.

Canada’s move is similar to Canada’s efforts to ensure that, if a Canadian travels to another country with a lower vaccination rate, the practice will no longer render their vaccinations invalid in that country. As more countries become increasingly measles-free, it becomes increasingly important to also secure upper vaccination rates in their own countries. This Canadian policy is vital to the safety of Canadians, visitors to Canada, and Canadians traveling abroad.

Previously, according to The Canadian Press, the Canadian government would typically only ask international travelers to submit proof of vaccination before allowing them to fly to Canada, regardless of whether their vaccinations had been expired or intact. This new policy means that every visa-free entry check will be directed to check the vaccinia vaccination status of all travelers to Canada. From there, it will be up to the Canadian government’s passport office to then either approve or deny a passport for the traveler as to whether they remain in Canada or not.

While the new policy does not reach Americans, as reported by The New York Times, it does facilitate the process of staying in Canada without a passport. It will also prevent travelers from bringing diseases like measles or mumps into Canada, either through severe air travel delays or gastrointestinal disorder that can stop people in their tracks while on the road.

The move follows a trend of countries around the world increasing their anti-vaccination policies, like Britain, Germany, and France, to not require vaccination at all. Although some evidence suggests that vaccines are not as safe as they were once thought to be, more and more data are coming in to suggest that a nation’s vaccination rates should not be based on a measure of popularity.

Read the full story at The Canadian Press.

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